Finishing off the Week. Looking Forward to the Weekend. Updated!!

Some from earlier.  And an advance on weekend reading:

Here's a big broker who sees “a tremendous tidal wave of interest” in retail real estate deals.  See the interview on GlobeSt.com with Jason Maier, director of the New York office of Stan Johnson.

A counter to this morning's mini-gusher of good news, here's a monthly survey of home builders across the U.S. by research firm John Burns Real Estate Consulting, that "has found that respondents’ sales of new homes declined by 8% in October from the September level and by 6% from a year earlier." A Burns analyst tells a Wall Street Journal blog that “October was basically a crummy month for a lot of builders.”

LG’s eventual/potential/notional new headquarters is staying in the news.  It is intended to be on the Palisades in New Jersey, and would be a big glass box and a campus across the river in the views of the Cloisters and Riverdale.  It would cost $300 million.  The best rundown of the the problems and players--from the Seoul-based electronics giant LG, which is looking to build a new U.S. headquarters, to the Bergen County Superior Court, to the Cloisters and its pristine view of New Jersey and its John D. Rockefeller heritage/legacy, to the Natural Resources Defense Council  and New Jersey conservation groups, to a whole bunch of interested parties—can be found here, in the Wall Street Journal

And:  the Times posted a big one today on "The Other Downtown"—more on Brooklyn, destined for a massive Sunday Real Estate section cover story.

Oh yeah:  this one's a hoot.  "Jones Lang LaSalle’s Hendrickson: Millennials changing shopping, working worlds," has Dave Hendrickson, a managing director in the Chicago home office of Jones Lang LaSalle discussing millennials, for no apparent reason, in REJournals.com. Well, Hendrickson has "four Millennial children of his own." And he "knows that the way they shop and work is different from the way his own generation did these same things." And more: “They are an interesting age group,” Hendrickson said. “They’ve had some really hard bumps in the road. They’ve seen the economy struggle. That makes them more conservative when it comes to spending and parting with their cash.” And the article brings in the whole of JLL: "Hendrickson isn’t the only official with Jones Lang LaSalle who’s taken a long look at the habits of Millennials and how they impact the commercial real estate world." There is much more from the Jones Lang LaSalle U.S. Cross Sector Outlook." For example, millennials love change. That "has had a broad impact across several types of commercial property." Stores are changing. Companies are changing.  You got the idea about a dozen sentences ago.  Check it out at this link above for, unbelievably, a lot more: "The Cross Sector report states that Millennials love gadgets, too.   . . ."

 

Dave Hendrickson knows Millennials. The managing director in the Chicago office of Jones Lang LaSalle has four Millennial children of his own. And Hendrickson knows that the way they shop and work is different from the way his own generation did these same things.

“They are an interesting age group,” Hendrickson said. “They’ve had some really hard bumps in the road. They’ve seen the economy struggle. That makes them more conservative when it comes to spending and parting with their cash.”

- See more at: http://www.rejournals.com/2013/11/22/jones-lang-lasalles-hendrickson-millennials-changing-shopping-working-worlds/#sthash.RtKHCbIx.dpuf
- See more at: http://www.rejournals.com/2013/11/22/jones-lang-lasalles-hendrickson-millennials-changing-shopping-working-worlds/#sthash.RtKHCbIx.dpuf

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